Center for Criminology and Public Policy Research

Assessing the Impact of Post-Release Supervision on Employment, Recidivism, and Re-Imprisonment

This project will additionally provide empirical evidence to state-level policy makers and administrators about the impact of community supervision of former inmates on employment, recidivism, and re-imprisonment. The sample for this study will include 256,253 inmates released between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2009. The analysis will examine the effect of supervision on the outcome variables using Survival Analysis to examine the probability of recidivism and the time to failure across the supervision types. Second, Logistic Regression will be used to estimate the impact of the type of supervision on the likelihood of recidivism, employment, and re-imprisonment within one, two, and three years after release. Finally, this study will examine the cost-benefits associated with the various types of post-release supervision. This study will produce four reports which will provide empirical evidence documenting the post-release impact of prison-based drug treatment, work-release, and re-imprisonment, as well as the cost-benefits of these programs. In addition, the various statistical methodologies utilized in this research will inform the research community of the differences, if any, that exist in examining research questions using four methodologies: random assignment, Logistic regression, Propensity Score Matching, and Precision Matching. Lastly, the substance abuse treatment study will yield a separate report that details the entire process of designing and implementing an experimental research study.

Four reports will be produced that will provide empirical evidence documenting the post-release impact of: prison-based drug treatment, work release, and re-imprisonment, as well as the cost-benefits of these programs. In addition, the various statistical methodologies utilized is this research will inform the research community of the differences, if any, of examining research questions using four methodologies: random assignment, logistic regression, propensity score matching, and precision matching. Lastly, the substance abuse treatment study will yield a separate report that details the entire process of designing the implementing an experimental.

Contact

William Bales, Ph.D.
Professor, FSU College of Criminology and Criminal Justice

Graduate Research Assistants: Catie Clark, Sam Scaggs

Dates: May 2012 to May 2015

Funding Agency: National Institute of Justice

Funding: $316,000