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Alliance for the Advancement of Education in Juvenile Justice and Adult Corrections

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Alliance of the Florida State University and the Correctional Education Association Uses Education to Prevent Future Crime

The United States is confronted with escalating prices and dwindling resources while having the highest incarceration rate in the world. From 1987 to 2007, America's prison population nearly tripled, and in 2008, 1 in 100 Americans will be behind bars1. The economic loss to society of just one delinquent becoming a career criminal is $1.5 to $1.8 million over the criminal's lifetime2. There is a pressing need for strategies that lower America's rates of incarceration and recidivism. Education needs to be one of these strategies.

Florida State University and the Correctional Education Association are building the Alliance for the Advancement of Education in Juvenile Justice and Adult Corrections. In cooperation with other organizations, the Alliance will provide leadership, direction, and research-driven services to advance education for students in juvenile and adult corrections.

The Alliance seeks to better prepare past criminals for successful reentry into society through supporting juvenile and adult correctional educators with research-driven education programs. The Alliance will also increase citizen awareness and legislative support for juvenile and adult correctional education through public relations and legislative advocacy.

To accomplish these goals, the Alliance will enhance the fields of juvenile and adult correctional education with these actions:

  1. Conduct outreach to existing correctional education organizations.
  2. Develop a national information clearinghouse for the field.
  3. Codify program standards that identify a uniform model(s).
  4. Increase professional development opportunities for correctional educators.
  5. Promote citizen awareness and legislative support for correctional education.

Ultimately, this collaboration will result in research and policy that improves the quality of education services in juvenile and adult corrections and reduces the social and economic cost of crime on society.

Learn more about the Florida State University criminology program at www.criminology.fsu.edu and the Correctional Education Association, www.ceanational.org.

Contacts

Tom Blomberg, Ph.D.
Dean and Sheldon L. Messinger Professor of Criminology
Florida State University
tblomberg@fsu.edu
850-644-7365

Stephen Steurer Ph.D
Executive Director
Correctional Education Association
SSteurer@ceanational.org
443-459-3080

1 The PEW; Center on the States, 2008.
2 Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Annual Report, 1999