Stults’ research focuses largely on discrimination in the application of social control. His recent work, published in Criminology and the American Journal of Sociology, addressed racial differences in arrest rates and variation in police force size as a result of perceived threat, fear, and prejudice.

Research Interests

Race and Crime | Neighborhoods and Crime | Residential Segregation

Education

Ph.D. 2003, University at Albany, State University of New York; Sociology

B.A. 1994, Western Michigan University; Sociology

Recent Publications

Stults, Brian J, and Matthew Hasbrouck. 2015. “The Effect of Commuting on City-Level Crime Rates” Journal of Quantitative Criminology 31: 331-350.

Lindsey, Andrea M., Daniel P. Mears, Joshua C. Cochran, William D. Bales and Brian J. Stults. 2015. “In Prison and Far From Home: Spatial Distance Effects on Inmate Misconduct” Crime & Delinquency. Online First.

Daniel P. Mears, Joshua C. Cochran, Brian J. Stults, Sarah J. Greenman, Avinash S. Bhati, Mark A. Greenwald. 2014. “The ‘True’ Juvenile Offender: Age Effects and Juvenile Court Sanctioning” Criminology.

Stults, Brian J., and Christi S. Falco. 2014. “Unbalanced Institutional Commitments and Criminal Behavior: an Individual Level Assessment of Institutional Anomie Theory” Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice 12: 77-100.

John R. Logan, Zengwang Xu, Brian J. Stults. 2014. “Interpolating U.S. Decennial Census Tract Data from as Early as 1970 to 2010: A Longitudinal Tract Database” The Professional Geographer 66: 412-420.

Selected Publications

Stults, Brian J., and Christi S. Falco. 2014. "Unbalanced Institutional Commitments and Criminal Behavior: an Individual Level Assessment of Institutional Anomie Theory." Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice 12:77-100.

Stults, Brian J. 2010. "Determinants of Chicago Neighborhood Homicide Trajectories: 1965-1995." Homicide Studies 14:244-267.

Stults, Brian J., and Eric P. Baumer. 2007. "Racial Threat and Police Force Size: Evaluating the Empirical Validity of the Minority Threat Perspective." American Journal of Sociology 113:507-546.